WHY AND HOW TOLL ROADS WORK FOR YOU!

Toll roads world-wide operate on the user-pays principle, in other words, road users pay a direct user fee for the portion of the road they utilise.

 

The toll road users pay on the N4 Toll Route continues to be used to develop the road’s infrastructure and a well-managed road network which in turn ensures a safer, faster, more convenient route as well as shortened travel time from Tshwane in Gauteng, South Africa to Maputo in Mozambique.

 

In addition, broader payback for South Africa and Mozambique has come from substantial investments in socio-economic development of the communities along the route, and the wider expansion of industry, commercial business and jobs in the region which in turn has cemented the success of the Maputo Corridor.

HOW YOUR TOLL FEE IS SPENT

The majority of the funds generated from toll fees are spent on the N4 toll road itself. It currently costs TRAC more than R100 000 per kilometer, per annum, for day-to-day maintenance of the route only. This is known as routine maintenance under which grass cuts, sealing of cracks, repairing of fences and potholes, upgrading signage and road markings and keeping guard rails in good condition fall under.

Toll fees also pay for road rehabilitation, major upgrades and expansion projects as well as the to pay the equity and debt that have been required to create this world-class international corridor.

WHO SETS TOLL FEES?

The toll fees on the N4 Toll Route were initially agreed by TRAC and the South African and Mozambican roads agencies, SANRAL and ANE respectively, at the start of the concession contract.

The fees were calculated against the benefit that the N4 Toll Route would offer road users, compared to an alternative road, and were set at a percentage of the saving.

Currently they are adjusted once a year in line with the consumer price index (CPI) by the respective National Departments of Transport.

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